How to Write a General Contractor Business Proposal

Do you need to write a proposal to promote your contractor or remodeling service business to a prospective client? Don’t sweat it! It doesn’t have to be an intimidating process. The goals for any service business proposal are the same: introduce your organization, highlight your services, describe the costs, and convince the client that you are the right choice for handicap permit the job. To speed up the proposal writing process, you may want to use pre-designed templates and get ideas from sample proposals.

Whether you are describing plumbing services, bidding a construction project, promoting your house painting services, quoting an HVAC installation, pitching your plan for a remodel, or even asking for funding to start up or expand a contractor business, your proposal structure will be similar. Here’s the basic structure to follow: introduce yourself, summarize the prospective client’s needs, then describe your services and costs, and finally, provide information about your organization, your credentials, and your capabilities.

For a contractor business, you will also need to include some detailed information about your services and history that is pertinent to the client’s specific project. For example, painting contractors might need to include information about the paints, stains, and equipment they typically use; remodeling contractors may want to include descriptions and photos of similar remodels they have successfully completed; and a general contractor would definitely want to include information about the experience and training of company personnel, safety records, bonding, insurance and so forth.

Always keep in mind that the purpose of a proposal is to persuade your potential clients to give you their business. You must prove that you can deliver the services they need. A simple quote or price list can never substitute for a real proposal.

Proposals should be targeted to a specific client. This means you need to gather information about your client so that you can present a proposal tailored to that individual client’s needs. It’s never a good idea to send all prospective clients the same sales letter especially when there are competing bids. Clients are much more likely to accept a proposal tailored just for them.

So, let’s get back to the order described above. Start your proposal with a Cover Letter and a Title Page. The Cover Letter should deliver a brief personal introduction and contain your company contact information. The Title Page is just what it sounds like: the name of your specific proposal (for example, “Proposal for the Munson Kitchen Remodel”, “Proposal to Construct the New Technical Institute Science Building” or “Installation of Your New HVAC System”).

After this introduction section, add topics that describe the needs of your client. If you are presenting a proposal for a complex project, you may need to write a summary to precede the detail pages. In a proposal for a corporate client, this is normally called an Executive Summary. For a less formal but still complex proposal, it’s more often called a Client Summary. In this summary and the following detail pages, you should demonstrate your understanding of the client’s requirements, goals, and desires, as well as discussing any restrictions or limitations you are aware of. This section should be all about the client.

Next is your chance to advertise yourself. Follow your introduction section and the client section with pages that describe what you are offering. These pages might have general headings like Services Provided, Features, Benefits, and Services Cost Summary, as well as more specific pages that detail the products and/or services you can provide and explain the associated costs.

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